Open Source Grammar | An ESL Grammar Text

Open Source Grammar

Welcome to Open Source Grammar. The goal for open source grammar is to give us teachers a chance to work together to provide a free (or near free) text for our students here

In other fields, instructors are doing what they can to write books for students.  A good example is merlot.org. We have yet to see any such texts for EFL/ESL students. It’s time we pool our resources and provide a text for English language learners.

As the name implies, Open Source grammar is completely open. You can do what you want with our entries. Put it on your homepage, print it up and use it for your classes, send students a link when they have a question… You can even print it up and sell it.

Myth about Open Source Grammar

There are a lot of misunderstandings about what ‘open source’ means.  It doesn’t always mean ‘free.’ A good example of an open source is the English language.  Anyone can use it for free.  People add to it by inventing new words.  If enough people agree that new words are useful enough, they stay around.  If someone decides to put these words into a song or book, in a particular way, they can charge for it. For a proper definition, please look here.

No one holds a copyright on the English language grammar system, but we would like you to be sure not to quote any copyrighted material. Please flag any copy written material if you see it.

How it works: so far, we have made Wikis for all of the grammar points in the CEFR. We are asking teachers to provide an explanation of the grammar point along with some activities and writing exercises.

To make it easier for our students and instructors to use, we will be making PDF versions of the wiki from time to time. We would also like to make the book available from online publishers such as blurb.com at cost should students want a ‘real’ textbook.

If you are in a country where you need to ‘publish or perish.’  Make your publication count! This text will save a lot of students a lot of money.  Thousands of language learners will read it.

If you publish a unit and would like to list your publication,  you can use this format:

Last, F. M. (Year, Month Date Published). Group title. Open Source Grammar. Retrieved Month Date, Year, from opensourcegrammar.org.

Here is an example:

Bishop, Robert (2013, October 25) Present Perfect. Open Source Grammar.

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